Africana Studies

Events

Contact Us

For more information about Africana Studies at Bard College or questions about this site:

Tabetha Ewing
Director of Africana Studies
Tel: 845-758-6822 x7548
E-mail: ewing@bard.edu
Office: Fairbairn 205
Bard College
PO Box 5000
Annandale-on-Hudson
New York 12504-5000

Upcoming Events

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Past Events

                    

2016

Tuesday, November 1, 2016
Humanitarian Heritage and Anxious Architectures in East Africa: A Long History of the Dadaab Refugee Camps
Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi, Assistant Professor and Faculty Fellow (NYU)
Olin Humanities 102  6:30 pm


This talk examines a history of the world’s largest designated set of settlements for refugees through its constructed environment and archival record, interrogating an ephemeral territorial form and the paradoxical heritage it proposes. If architecture and infrastructure have entrenched a quarter century of humanitarian intervention by the United Nations at Dadaab, Kenya, the site has been depicted instead as precarious. Occluded at once through aesthetic codings and archival silences, its permanence has been veiled in fragile architectures of an international humanitarian aid operation and in pastoral landscapes of a contested desert borderland traditionally inhabited by nomadic Somalis. Rather than a provisional artifact of the 1991 crisis that occasioned humanitarian operations in northeast Kenya, I posit that this territory unfolded as exceptional and emergent over the course of a century: knowable through visual, historical, and ethnographic study of architecture and territory. My research recuperates a figuration and construction of humanitarian territory in missionary settlements for freed slaves in the nineteenth century, imperial and postcolonial systems of land tenure in the twentieth, and forced sedentarization of pastoralists in the twenty-first. Through this analysis, I interrogate a problematic humanitarian heritage of furtive architectures, which at once liberate and coerce, resist as well as assert colonial and national borders, and make claims upon abject suffering as well as its salvation. These confront and index our representations and constructions of emancipation, emergency, city, Africa, the native, and the precariousness of ephemerality itself.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Art History Program; Human Rights Program
Contact: Olga Touloumi  otouloum@bard.edu
Monday, October 24, 2016
Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II
A Lecture by Farah Jasmine Griffin
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  4:30 pm
Farah Jasmine Griffin, William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University

"Her body in the air looked like an abstract sculpture," Griffin writes of Pearl Primus's dance in the 1840s.  

"In her book “Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II,[2013]” Farah Jasmine Griffin, a professor at Columbia University, delves into a largely underexplored aspect of Harlem’s rich history: the years just before, during and immediately after World War II, a period of optimism, creativity and turmoil. Moreover, Griffin uses the lives of three female artists — the choreographer and dancer Pearl Primus, the writer Ann Petry and the composer and pianist Mary Lou Williams — as signposts through an era, in a work that paints the “greatest generation” in a much less flattering light than do the usual jingoistic accounts."  ~The New York Times
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Dance Program; Difference and Media Project; Historical Studies Program; Literature Program
Contact: Myra Armstead  845-758-6822  armstead@bard.edu
  Thursday, October 20, 2016
"In Poor Taste: Thoughts on Sugar, Labor, and the Special Commodity"
 
Anjuli Raza Kolb, Williams College
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  6:00 pm
This talk posits zombi as an immanent theory of labor, consumption, and the material itinerary of what we call taste. Beginning with an account of Marx’s special commodity, Professor Raza Kolb will explore how production and consumption crystallize into a set of signs pointing beyond allegories of monstrosity, and beyond a West Indian aesthetics bounded by capital in the age of empire and today.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Experimental Humanities Program; Human Rights Program; LAIS Program
Contact: Alex Benson  845-758-6822  abenson@bard.edu
Thursday, September 29, 2016
Black Lives Matter:
Anthropological Perspectives
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:00 pm
How does anthropological thinking help us make sense of the recent Black Lives Matter movement?  How have anthropologists spoken about this movement as part of their research or as engaged citizens?  What kinds of new questions does BLM raise about the politics of race and protest movements in on and offline worlds?  In this panel, both faculty and students from the anthropology program will speak briefly about their interpretations and questions that relate to the Black Lives Matter movement to generate a broader conversation in dialogue with anthropological perspectives.
Sponsored by: Anthropology Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
  Thursday, May 5, 2016
PEEP!
student curated short-film screenings inspired by PEEP cinema
Preston  5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Students Grace Calderly and Lian Ladia curate a selection of short films focused on "the insider looking or in" and the return of the gaze in the idea of peep cinema. This film program is the students final project for Curating Cinema at CCS Bard.
Contact: Lian Ladia  845-594-1704  jl6096@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 26, 2016
In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and its Ironies- A talk with David Rieff
Join us on Tuesday, April 26th in Olin 102 at 7PM for a talk with David Rieff on his new book "In Praise of Forgetting"
Olin, Room 102  7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
David Rieff is the author of many books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West, A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis, and, most recently, The Reproach of Hunger: Food, Justice, and Money in the 21st Century. He lives in New York City.In his Book "In Praise of Forgetting", He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, “inoculate” the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds—whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces—neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option—sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.Ranging widely across some of the defining conflicts of modern times—the Irish Troubles and the Easter Uprising of 1916, the white settlement of Australia, the American Civil War, the Balkan wars, the Holocaust, and 9/11—Rieff presents a pellucid examination of the uses and abuses of historical memory. His contentious, brilliant, and elegant essay is an indispensable work of moral philosophy.We Hope to see you there!!
Sponsored by: Human Rights Program; Human Rights Project
Contact: Aasiyah Ali  845-758-7650  aa6282@bard.edu
Monday, April 18, 2016
Religion, witchcraft, magic and kinship in former colonies of Great Britain and Portugal
Peter Fry



Olin, Room 201  5:00 pm
Peter is a scholar, social commentator and public intellectual with an unusual range of research experience. Born in England and educated at Cambridge University, his career has taken him to Southern Africa and to Brazil, where he has lived and taught for forty years. He is one of Brazil’s most distinguished anthropologists, a former Vice-President of the Brazilian Association of Anthropologists, and editor of the leading anthropological journal Vibrant.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Environmental and Urban Studies Program; Global and International Studies Program; Religion Program
Contact: Drew Thompson  845-758-4600  dthompso@bard.edu
Friday, April 8, 2016
Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice
April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

Blum  9:00 am
Friday, April 8 @Blum

9am Prelude
Georgian Polyphony Workshop with Carl Linich

10am  Aurality
A panel discussion with Tomie Hahn (RPI), Brian Hochman (Georgetown University), Julianne Swartz (Bard College), & Amanda Weidman (Bryn Mawr College)
Chaired by Alex Benson (Bard College0

11:30am  Interlude
Physics of Sound with Matthew Deady
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

1:00pm  Transmission
A panal discussion with Masha Godovannaya (Smolny College), Tom Porcello (Vassar College), Drew Thompson (Bard College0, and Olga Touloumi (Bard College0
Chaired by Danielle Riou (Bard College)

2:30pm Interlude
Oral History Workshop with Suzanne Snider
Soundwalk with Todd Shalom

3:30pm  Resonance
A panel discussion with Marie Abe (Boston University), Emilio Distretti (Al-Quds), Erica Robles-Anderson (NYU), Maria Sonevytsky (Bard College), & David Suisman (University of Delaware)
Chaired by Laura Kunreuther

5:00pm  Deep Listening Workshop
with Pauline Oliveros

6:00pm  Closing Remarks
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 7, 2016
Black in Latin America: Mexico and Peru
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
We will be screening the Black in Latin America film series. Join us to view the episode about Mexico and Peru, with food provided. Discussion will follow.  Co-sponsored by BEOP Club, Spanish Studies Program, LASO, BSO and La Voz
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; LAIS Program; La Voz; Spanish Studies
Contact: Jane Duffstein  845-758-7492  duffy@bard.edu
  Thursday, April 7, 2016
Sound in Theory, Sound in Practice
April 7-8, 2016 at Bard College
a two day symposium exploring the place of sound in the arts, sciences, and humanities

László Z. Bitó '60 Conservatory Building  2:30 pm
Thursday, April 7 @Bito

2:30pm Opening Lecture
Emily Thompson (Princeton University)
Sound Theory as Sound Practice

4pm  Exhinition Opening
Featuring work by Lesley Flanigan, Tristan Perich, Natalia Fedorova, and Bard College faculty and students

5:30pm Keynote Lecture
Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in
Culture & Technology, McGill University
Audile Scarification:
Notes on the Normalization of Hearing Damage
 **This event is free and open to the public. 
Registration is required for all interludes**

 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; American Studies Program; Anthropology Program; Art History Program; Center for Civic Engagement; Computer Science Program; Dean of the College; Division of Languages and Literature; Division of Science, Mathematics, and Computing; Division of Social Studies; Division of the Arts; Experimental Humanities Program; Film and Electronic Arts Program; Historical Studies Program; Human Rights Project; Office of the President; Physics Program; Studio Arts Program
Contact: Laura Kunreuther  845-758-7215  kunreuth@bard.edu
Tuesday, April 5, 2016
The Ghost of Cervantes: Don Quixote in La Mancha, Don Quixote in Manhattan
A lecture by Gerardo Piña-Rosales, Prof. of Spanish Literature at CUNY and Director of the North American Academy of the Spanish Language
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium  5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
The influence of Cervantes’ Don Quixote on contemporary literature is unmeasurable. Prof. Piña-Rosales will refer to works by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Gustav Flaubert and Franz Kafka, Herman Melville, Vladimir Nabokov and Kathy Acker, all haunted by the ghost of Cervantes. Piña-Rosales will also offer a reflection on possible contemporary readings of Don Quixote by analyzing various editions of the work that have recently appeared both in English translation and in Spanish, including the new commemorative edition by the Royal Spanish Academy.
 
This event is conceived as a tribute to the living ghost of Miguel de Cervantes, founder of the modern novel, at the occasion of the 400th anniversary of his death. Piña-Rosales’ lecture will be followed a bilingual reading of excerpts from his novella, Don Quijote en Manhattan/Don Quixote in Manhattan.
 
In English. Open to all.
 
For further information, please contact Prof. López-Gay.
 
 
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Division of Languages and Literature; LAIS Program; LASO; La Voz; Spanish Studies
Contact: Patricia Lopez-Gay  845-845-6050  plopezga@bard.edu
Thursday, February 25, 2016
Black in Latin America Film Series
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room  6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
We will screen the Black in Latin America film about the Dominican Republic and Haiti. Dinner and discussion will be part of the event. Co-hosted by Spanish Studies Program, BEOP Club, LASO, BSO and La Voz
Sponsored by: LAIS Program; La Voz; Spanish Studies
Contact: Jane Duffstein  845-758-7492  duffy@bard.edu
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
The Ottoman Scramble for Africa
Mostafa Minawi
Assistant Professor of History, Cornell University

Olin, Room 203  6:00 pm
As the inter-imperial competition for territorial expansion in Africa heated up in the last 20 years of the 19th century, Istanbul devised a complex strategy that allowed it to give its imperial counterparts a run for their money. This talk will focus on one aspect of this strategy, which involved building a partnership with the local power brokers in the Eastern Sahara and the Lake Chad Basin.

Mostafa Minawi is Assistant Professor of History and the Director of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Initiative (OTSI) at Cornell University. He is currently a visiting research fellow at the Remarque Institute, NYU. His book, The Ottoman Scramble for Africa: Empire and Diplomacy in the Sahara and The Hijaz, will be published by Stanford University Press in May 2016.
Sponsored by: Africana Studies Program; Historical Studies Program; Middle Eastern Studies Program
Contact: Omar Cheta  845-758-6265  ocheta@bard.edu